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Strategic HR panning in HEI

Teacher: Dinh Hong An (0 )
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Description

Recent studies have shown that high performing business organizations practice strategic human resource management (SHRM). However, there is a huge gap in both conceptual and or empirical studies on SHRM in higher education. This gap is more so in the Arab world. Although many institutions have noted the importance of some elements of strategic human resource management, few have practiced the elements on a frequent basis. It was the purpose of this study to explore the integration of institutional strategies to HRM by examining the strategic HRM practices in universities in Saudi. A quantitative and qualitative exploratory research design was used to study strategic human resources management best practices in higher education in Saudi Arabia. Literature was reviewed and the general features of strategic HRM practices were identified. These were captured in a survey instrument which was later administered to staff in the selected higher education institutions in Saudi to determine the extent of strategic HRM implementation. Statistical analysis was conducted to cluster similar variables together with the aim of identifying the focal areas for determining the extent to which strategic HRM practices had been implemented in a university. The results of the study indicate that based on participants’ perceptions, the higher education institutions under study have a strong level of awareness of SHRM. However, Saudi higher education is facing major problems surrounding the development of human capital, especially of the faculty members and needs to devote more attention to their SHRM practices. The employee recruitment and selection process is largely inadequate and needs effective attention. The results also showed that the performance appraisal and compensation system does not guarantee a highly motivated core of staff, especially if they are expatriate workers. As a result of these findings, there are strong implications for administrators, faculty, and other higher education personnel interested in applying and improving their best practices in strategic human resources management. Future research should include more universities, both public and private. In addition, future research should also consider moderating variables such as university culture, organization climate, and the labour market, especially with the Saudization (nationalisation) of the labour force, legal and regulatory environment. Drawing on the analysis, the study contributes rich and fruitful findings to the area of strategic human resource management.

Curriculum

Recent studies have shown that high performing business organizations practice strategic human resource management (SHRM). However, there is a huge gap in both conceptual and or empirical studies on SHRM in higher education. This gap is more so in the Arab world. Although many institutions have noted the importance of some elements of strategic human resource management, few have practiced the elements on a frequent basis. It was the purpose of this study to explore the integration of institutional strategies to HRM by examining the strategic HRM practices in universities in Saudi. A quantitative and qualitative exploratory research design was used to study strategic human resources management best practices in higher education in Saudi Arabia. Literature was reviewed and the general features of strategic HRM practices were identified. These were captured in a survey instrument which was later administered to staff in the selected higher education institutions in Saudi to determine the extent of strategic HRM implementation. Statistical analysis was conducted to cluster similar variables together with the aim of identifying the focal areas for determining the extent to which strategic HRM practices had been implemented in a university. The results of the study indicate that based on participants’ perceptions, the higher education institutions under study have a strong level of awareness of SHRM. However, Saudi higher education is facing major problems surrounding the development of human capital, especially of the faculty members and needs to devote more attention to their SHRM practices. The employee recruitment and selection process is largely inadequate and needs effective attention. The results also showed that the performance appraisal and compensation system does not guarantee a highly motivated core of staff, especially if they are expatriate workers. As a result of these findings, there are strong implications for administrators, faculty, and other higher education personnel interested in applying and improving their best practices in strategic human resources management. Future research should include more universities, both public and private. In addition, future research should also consider moderating variables such as university culture, organization climate, and the labour market, especially with the Saudization (nationalisation) of the labour force, legal and regulatory environment. Drawing on the analysis, the study contributes rich and fruitful findings to the area of strategic human resource management.